Contact

Fridgehub Resources

Category: Resources

The Fridgehub team have been busy working up a handy infographic which summarises the key dates for the F-Gas Regulations, the ban on new equipment placed on the market and the service and maintenance bans.

F-GAS ROADMAP from Fridgehub®

The new F-Gas Regulations will reduce F-Gas emissions by two-thirds of today's levels by 2030 and ban the use of F-Gases in some new equipment where viable climate-friendly alternatives are readily available. The main novelty and driver for moving towards climate-friendly technologies is the introduction of a phase-down measure which from 2015 will limit the total amount of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) – the most significant group of F-Gases - sold in the EU and reduce their quantities in steps to one-fifth of today's sales by 2030.

This measure is accompanied by a number of new restrictions on the use and sale of F-Gases in equipment. These ambitious measures will build on and benefit from the successful phase-out of ozone-depleting substances which was achieved in the EU 10 years ahead of the internationally agreed schedule.

Common HFCs affected by the service and maintenance ban are:

TYPE                      GWPs

R404A                   3922

R422A                   3143

R422D                   2729

R507                      3985

 

Key Dates:

Ban on new equipment placed on the Market

01/01/2015 -       HFCs with GWPs of 150 or more - Applies to domestic refrigerators and freezers

01/01/2020 -       HFCs with GWPs of 2500 and over - Applies to hermetically sealed commercial refrigerators and freezers

01/01/2020 -       HFCs with GWPs of 2500 or more - Applies to stationary refrigeration equipment or it’s associated remote plant. Equipment operating below -50 deg C is exempt

01/01/2020 -       HFCs with GWPs of 150 or more - Applies to portable air-conditioning appliances i.e. hermetically sealed equipment which is movable between rooms

01/01/2022 -       HFCs with GWPs of 150 and over - Applies to hermetically sealed commercial refrigerators and freezers

01/01/2022 -       HFCs with a GWP of 150 and over - Applies to commercial refrigeration central plant with a capacity of 40kW or more that contain or are dependent upon for their operation, HFCs with GWPs of 150 or more - except where used in the primary refrigerant circuit of cascade systems, where HFCs with a GWP of less than 1500 may be used

01/01/2025 -       Applies to single split air-conditioning with less than 3kg charge of HFCs with GWPs of 750 or more

Service and maintenance bans

01/01/2020 -       HFCs with GWPs of 2500 or more - Applies to equipment with a charge of 40 tonnes CO2e or above (equivalent to 10.4kg of R404A), although equipment operating at below -50 deg C or military applications are exempt

01/01/2030 -       Reclaimed HFCs with GWPs of 2500 or more - Used for the maintenance or servicing of existing refrigeration equipment – provided they are labelled appropriately

01/01/2030 -       Recycled HFCs with GWPs of 2500 or more - Used in the maintenance or servicing of existing refrigeration equipment - provided they have been recovered from such the equipment. Can only be used by the firm that recovered it or by the firm whose installation it was recovered from.

Feel free to share the infographic with your peers and your network, please credit www.fridgehub.com and @TheFridgehub

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) OzonAction Branch has published a booklet entitled ‘Low-GWP Alternatives in Commercial Refrigeration: Propane, CO2 and HFO Case Studies’ as part of UNEP’s work programme under the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC).  

The publication is the first in a series featuring case studies on alternatives to hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), providing information on energy efficient, zero to low-GWP alternatives - intended to assist relevant decision makers, especially those in developing countries, in selecting the most appropriate climate-friendly alternatives.

The studies cover a cross-section of low-GWP applications being adopted by supermarkets around the globe, from C02 transcritical and secondary cascade systems, and the adoption of low flammable refrigerant and HFO alternatives. They go on to cover the valuable lessons learned to enable a smooth transition away from high-GWP refrigerants and assist in selections of future refrigerants.

The case studies include the type of facility, a background to the project, type of system,  installation and refrigerant adopted, along with the challenges that were presented, system performance - advantages and disadvantages. 

Case studies included within this first publication include;

CarrefourSA Express, Kurtköy, Turkey

Transition from HFC R404A to a CO2 transcritical system - download

Sobeys (IGA), Cookshirein, Quebec, Canada

​New CO2 transcritical system – download

​​Verdemar, Nova Lima, Belo Horizonte, Brazil

​New CO2 cascade system using R-134a as primary circuit – download

Waitrose, Bromley, Kent, United Kingdom

​HFO R-1234ze chiller plant system – download

H-E-B, Mueller, Austin, Texas, United States

​Propane (R-290) self-contained integral case installation – download

To download the full publication click here

The CCAC recently launched a transformative initiative, entitled ‘The HFC Initiative, Promoting HFC Alternative Technology and Standards’ – it’s objectives being to:

  • Encourage the uptake of climate-friendly alternatives that could support national, regional and global policies or approaches to reduce reliance on high-GWP HFCs;
  • Overcome barriers that limit the widespread introduction of these climate friendly technologies, including those related to the establishment of standards; and
  • Encourage the responsible management of existing equipment and better designs for future equipment in order to minimize leaks.

Source : United Nations Environment Programme, 2014

About CCAC

The Climate and Clean Air Coalition to Reduce Short- Lived Climate Pollutants (CCAC) is a unique global effort supporting fast actions to mitigate the impacts of short lived climate pollutants, such as black carbon, methane and many hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and addressing near-term climate change and air pollution at the same time. The CCAC is a voluntary partnership bringing together over 36 country and Regional Economic Integration Organization (REIO) partners and 44 non-state partners including intergovernmental organisations, representatives of civil society and the private sector. 

ASHRAE has released the newly revised ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 105-2014, Standard Methods of Determining, Expressing, and Comparing Building Energy Performance and Greenhouse Gas Emissions.

The new edition includes procedures for calculating site and source energy, but a number of decisions are left to adopters, including what should be calculated beyond site energy and the multipliers for those calculations.  The newly revised ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 105-2014, Standard Methods of Determining, Expressing, and Comparing Building Energy Performance and Greenhouse Gas Emissions, supports commonality in reporting the energy performance of existing or proposed buildings to provide a consistent method of measuring, expressing and comparing the energy performance of buildings.

When it comes to the how-to of measuring a building’s energy use, there is much to take into consideration. Are the measurements of a building’s area—used in the equation to derive energy use per square foot—to be taken from the exterior dimensions or to the centerline of the wall? Since they are normally unoccupied, are storage spaces to be included or not?

Keith Emerson, Chair of the Standard 105 committee, said:

“A standard method of measurement is needed in order to be able to compare one building's energy use to another.  For instance, comparing one building's summer energy use to another building's winter use would be comparing apples and oranges.”

It also provides a common basis for reporting building energy use in terms of delivered energy forms and expressions of energy performance; for comparing design options; and for comparing energy performance in terms of energy resources used and greenhouse gas emissions created, both across buildings and for energy efficiency measures within buildings.

“To keep the standard flexible, a number of decisions are left to those who adopt it, including what should be calculated beyond site energy and the multipliers for those additional calculations,” Emerson said.

Primary energy and greenhouse gas equivalence conversion factors have been left to the discretion of the adopting agencies and authorities, which are available from a number of sources, including an informative appendix in the standard. The standard has also been upgraded to code enforceable language.

The cost of Standard 105-2014, Standard Methods of Determining, Expressing, and Comparing Building Energy Performance and Greenhouse Gas Emissions, is $58 ($48 ASHRAE members). To order, visit www.ashrae.org/bookstore .

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a non profit building technology society with more than 50,000 members worldwide. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality and sustainability within the industry. Through research, standards writing, publishing and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today.

 

ASHRAE's areas of expertise include:

  • energy efficiency
  • high performance buildings
  • indoor air quality
  • green building design
  • building codes and standards
  • data center air conditioning and ventilation
  • health concerns such as Legionnaire's
  • disease and mold growth
  • guidance for a safe environment during extraordinary events.

Image credit: Efired Shutterstock.com

The domestic RHI scheme is due to launch in spring 2014, so Ofgem are busy preparing for launch. When it does, you’ll be able to get full information, guides and videos, and will be able to apply from the Ofgem website.

The RHI is a government financial incentive to encourage a switch to renewable heating systems. It’s a way to help the UK reduce carbon emissions. At the moment, it only has a Non-Domestic Scheme, which broadly speaking is for industry and organisations.  The Domestic scheme is due to launch in spring 2014, so we’re busy preparing for launch. When it does, you’ll be able to get full information, guides and videos, and will be able to apply from this site.

Until then, Ofgem have produced some factsheets to give you some basic information in advance. They’re only designed as tasters. You’ll have to wait until the scheme opens to read their comprehensive guides.

The factsheets are:

An introduction to the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive - If you're considering or intending to apply.

The Renewable Heat incentive – Domestic or Non-Domestic? - If you're not sure which scheme to apply to.

Installed a renewable heating system before Domestic RHI opening? - The difference for you versus others for when you apply to the scheme.

Do I need metering for the Domestic RHI? - Everyone considering applying needs to check if they do beforehand.

A metering and monitoring service package for the Domestic RHI - An optional type of metering, similar to a service contract.

What is the RHI?

In July 2013, the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) published a document about how the Domestic RHI scheme will work: Renewable Heat Incentive: The first step to transforming the way we heat our homes [PDF].

Who is it for?

The Domestic RHI will cover homes in England, Scotland and Wales. It’s for: people who live in homes they own, private landlords, social landlords and people that build their own homes.  Within these categories, anyone who installed a renewable heating system from 15 July 2009 and meet the other eligibility criteria can apply. Their system will need to be registered with Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS).  The scheme is targeted at, but not limited to, homes off the gas grid.

What's happening when?

This is a simplified anticipated timeline of the process for launch:

Once the Regulations are finalised and approved, Ofgem will provide more web content and guidance.

 

Find out more

If you’re considering installing a renewable heating system, the following links can help you prepare:

Energy Saving Trust - Those new to renewable heating can find a wealth of information on its website. It also offers an enquiries helpline for free, impartial advice about energy efficiency and is already handling all queries about the Domestic RHI.

In order to fully support the launch in spring of the domestic RHI, The Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) has been doing a lot of work to modify the installer standards for the heat technologies (Biomass, Solar Thermal and Heat Pumps). The MCS Working Groups have updated the standards to ensure that MCS heat technology installations can robustly meet all the requirements that will enable government to make MCS the requirement for customers wishing to access the incentive.  A summary of the changes can be found via the MCS website

·         Download the MCS Consumer Guide here.

·         Download the MCS Installer and Manufacturers Guide here.

 

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

As refrigerant use practices are constantly evolving, particularly to establish which refrigerants are suitable for which applications, the European Fluorocarbons Technical Committee (EFCTC) has published a factsheet presenting objective basic accident and incident statistics for all refrigerants types, including alternative refrigerants and Fluorocarbons.

The factsheet presents the results of a non-comprehensive survey/collection of the global frequency of accidents due to refrigerant releases in the last eight years , in order to assess the safety of all refrigerants : fluorocarbons, ammonia (R-717), hydrocarbons (mainly propane R-290, propylene R-1270, butane R-600, isobutane R-600a ), and CO2 (carbon dioxide R-744).

It is widely recognized that refrigerants are selected on the basis of a number of criteria which include safety, energy efficiency and environmental impact.

Fluorocarbons (HFCs) have a favourable safety profile since they display low flammability and low toxicity characteristics.

Alternative refrigerants such as ammonia, hydrocarbons and CO2 are used on a much more limited basis than the fluorocarbons (HFCs) because they do not easily meet the currently applicable standards and local codes designed to provide safety in use for the general public, and to contribute to safe servicing and maintenance for engineers. It is, for example, well-known that ammonia is toxic, that hydrocarbons are extremely flammable and that CO2 is an asphyxiant that requires very high pressure to operate.

You can download the factsheet by clicking here

About EFCTC

Fluorocarbons are used as feedstocks, as refrigerants, as solvents and as blowing agents for insulation plastic foams. The Sector Group’s main objective is to monitor the constantly changing legislation related to HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons), PFCs (perfluorinated carbons) and SF6 (sulphur hexafluoride), CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons), HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons), in the EU and at global level.

This article is brought to you by Fridgehub – The online directory and information service for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

www.fridgehub.com

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

 

Article by Jennifer Chappell, Bircham Dyson Bell @BDB_Law

Did you know that from the end of this year it will be illegal to use R22 refrigerant (new, recycled or reclaimed) in existing air-conditioning equipment?  The options are simple. Replace your whole AC unit or use an alternative modern refrigerant gas to top it up - which will still involve replacing major parts of your current AC system.

What is R22? - R22 is an ozone depleting gas currently used in the majority of air conditioning systems that were installed before 2004. Since 2010, new or “virgin” R22 has been banned in all EU Member States.

Recycled or reclaimed R22 has been an exception to the rule until now. From 1 January 2015, use of any R22 will become illegal. Breach of the relevant EU Regulations could result in a summary conviction and maximum statutory penalty.  Replacement of an entire AC system is, of course, expensive. Modification of an existing AC system which uses R22 may be possible but, even if you can modify, it may be inefficient and increase energy costs which owners / occupiers are already trying to avoid.

So who pays? - If you are the owner / occupier of a commercial or residential building with air-conditioning containing R22, then you alone will be hit by the costs and you need to get your AC system altered or changed before the end of this year.

If the building is let to a single tenant and the tenant is responsible for the repair and maintenance of the whole building (including plant and equipment), it is likely that the tenant is required to replace equipment which can no longer be repaired.  It will depend on the wording of the repairing covenant and your lease is the first place to look. If the landlord has responsibility for maintaining the plant and equipment then the works need to be done at his cost.

If the building is let to several tenants, then the landlord will want to recover the cost of replacement or modification through the service charge. Whether the landlord can do this is dependent on the wording of your lease. In multi-let buildings, the service charge provisions of all leases should be checked because the terms may have been negotiated and there could be differences.

Other offences - If the works are not carried out before the end of this year, tenants could not only be committing a statutory offence, but could also be in breach of the covenant in your lease (on complying with statutory obligations). This may give rise to the landlord attempting to forfeit your lease.

2014 could be an expensive year for landlords and tenants. If you need help getting to grips with the implications of R22 then please do get in touch with Jennifer Chappell at www.bdb-law.co.uk

 

Fridgehub, providing information and resources to Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heat Pump Suppliers, Contractors and Retail Business Operators

Visit the Fridgehub App StoreBecome a member of the Fridgehub communitySign up and register your Company in the Fridgehub directory

Are you an employer of technicians who work on refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump equipment?

REAL Alternatives has sent out a call to action inviting employers and manufacturers to share their views on readiness for the broader use of alternative refrigerants, and how they can best prepare the workforce for the challenges ahead.

Looking specifically at what the training requirements are for carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrocarbon and HFO refrigerants, this survey will help the REAL Alternatives consortium to develop blended learning material (classroom based lesson plans, e-learning and a resource library) in the future.

They are also inviting those who have existing learning resources that they would like to share with the project to come forward via the survey.

You can take part in the online survey here. Closing date for participants is January 23, 2014.

About REAL Alternatives

REAL Alternatives programme focuses on carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrocarbon and HFO refrigerants. The objective being to improve knowledge in the service and maintenance of these refrigerants in new systems from the point of view of safety, efficiency, reliability and containment.

Delivered through innovative blended learning - a mix of e-learning, face-to-face training materials, practical exercises, assessments and an e-library of learning resources - the programme brings together industry knowledge and expertise from across Europe. REAL Alternatives will also build on the established REAL Skills Europe & REAL Zero containment approaches.

The two year project will be led by a consortium of six partners from across Europe and is funded by the EU Lifelong Learning Programme. The consortium includes training and professional institutes as well as employer representative bodies. All partners in the REAL Alternatives consortium will contribute to each aspect of the programme with the following key areas of responsibility:

You can find out more about REAL Alternatives by visiting their website here www.realalternatives.eu

This article is brought to you by Fridgehub – a major new industry website for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

www.fridgehub.com

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

 

 

The 2013 Institute of Refrigeration (IoR) Annual Conference ‘REAL Zero 2013 and beyond: containment, efficiency and alternative refrigerants. Strategies and priorities for future proofing the industry’ took place on the 2nd December 2013 in London.  In a paper presented at the 2013 conference, Jane Gartshore from Cool Concerns Ltd looked at the impact of Real Zero and the lessons that the industry has learned.

IOR

Real Zero highlighted the scale and impact of leakage and raised the importance of leak reduction within the RAC industry. Part of its success has been in the branding of leakage reduction – from “Real Zero caps” for Schrader valves to a “Real Zero installation”. It has raised the profile of leakage and increased awareness. This paper discusses the lessons we learned and those we should have learned.  Leakage has always been an issue for the RAC industry and leakage issues have not fundamentally changed for decades. Leakage is why we had to change from ozone depleting refrigerants and why we are now facing a potential phase out of F Gas refrigerants.

Historically leakage issues have evolved from CFCs to HCFCs to HFCs. In some cases leakage has been exacerbated by retrofitting systems, for example by the effect of the conversion process itself on seals and gaskets. Many CFC and HCFC systems have been converted and little was done to repair leakage - reducing the ODP of the refrigerant was the sole aim.  The aim of Real Zero was to provide the resource to enable a fundamental change of attitude to one which prioritises leak reduction – whatever the refrigerant.

The full programme of papers and presentations can be downloaded here: http://www.ior.org.uk/paperandpresentations2013

About Jane Gartshore BSc FInstR MASHRAE

Jane started her career as a graduate engineer working on the test, design and development of commercial compressors and condensing units.  She later moved into technical sales, preparing technical literature, carrying out training sessions, sizing equipment as well as troubleshooting and liaising with distributors worldwide.  Since 1991 she has carried out a wide range of consultancy and training work in the UK and overseas. She is immediate past president of the UK Institute of Refrigeration.

The Institute of Refrigeration has announced its role in a new European learning programme “REAL Alternatives” that will address skills shortages amongst technicians working in the refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump sector.

The focus will be on carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrocarbon and HFO refrigerants. It will improve knowledge in the service and maintenance of these refrigerants in new systems from the point of view of safety, efficiency, reliability and containment.  Delivered through innovative blended learning - a mix of e-learning, face-to-face training materials, practical exercises, assessments and an e-library of learning resources – the programme will bring together industry knowledge and expertise from across Europe.

REAL Alternatives will also build on the established REAL Skills Europe & REAL Zero containment approaches.  This two year project will be led by a consortium of six partners from across Europe and is funded by the EU Lifelong Learning Programme. The consortium includes training and professional institutes as well as employer representative bodies. All partners in the REAL Alternatives consortium will contribute to each aspect of the programme with the following key areas of responsibility:

  • Clarifying alternative refrigerant training needs and opportunities in Europe -London South Bank University, UK
  • Developing a specification for the e-learning and reviewing resources currently available in Europe to support learning, London South Bank University, UK
  • Developing e-learning process, integrating practical learning materials, resources and translation, Limburg Catholic University College (KHLim), Belgium
  • Piloting and testing of materials with live audiences in five languages (English, Italian, German, Polish and Flemish) Associazione Tecnici del Freddo (ATF), Italy
  • Monitoring the impact of the project and evaluating success, IKKE training centre Duisburg, Germany
  • Publicity, promotion, and stakeholder engagement, Association of European Refrigeration Air Conditioning and Heat Pump Contractors (AREA) & Institute of Refrigeration, UK
  • Project Management, Institute of Refrigeration
  • Identifying opportunities for long term sustainability of outputs, PROZON recycling programme, Poland.

A programme website will launched in December at www.realalternatives.eu

This article is brought to you by Fridgehub – a major new industry website for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

www.fridgehub.com

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

Subscribe to Fridgehub Industry News Updates

ATMOsphere Europe 13 consisted of a series of interactive workshops bringing together decision makers from industry and government to change the future of natural refrigerants.

We are bringing our readers a selection of the presentations from the conference with the main theme being “Natural Refrigerants”-Solutions for Europe”.

Integrated CO₂ booster for high-efficiency cooling, heating and air conditioning – PRESENTATION

ATMOsphere presentation

Jens Kallesoe, presented Advansor’s Sigma system, which combines the supermarket’s entire thermal needs (refrigeration, AC and heat recovery) in one unit and was installed in a new Co-op Maxi store in Tocksfors, Sweden. It incorporates new technologies such as parallel compression and heat pump function with artificial loads on the cabinets.  View the Integrated CO₂ booster for high-efficiency cooling, heating and air conditioning – View the technical presentation from Advansor at ATMOsphere Europe here.

CM FRIGO 360 Degree natural refrigerant solutions – PRESENTATION

 ATMOsphere presentation 2

View the SCM FRIGO 360 Degree natural refrigerant solutions – here.

This presentation outlines the various stages of SCM Frigo’s CO2 technology development from 2005 to 2013. It emphasises that safety aspects and training are still a barrier and the industry needs to focus on providing information for customers, contractors and service providers. With legislation focusing more on environmental and efficiency aspects, end users and manufacturers will continue to invest more in natural refrigerant technologies.  The presentation was delivered by Mirko Bernabei, Technical Director and R&D Manager of the SCM Group.

Many case study sessions that focus on cutting-edge natural refrigerant technologies and projects in the areas of industrial, commercial and transport refrigeration as well as heat pumps and air-conditioning were included at the ATMOsphere Europe 2013 Conference. The full range of presentations from ATMOsphere Europe can be found on www.ATMO.org.

This article is brought to you by Fridgehub – a major new industry website for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

www.fridgehub.com

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

Subscribe to Fridgehub Industry News Updates