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The European Heat Pump Association (EHPA) has published a position statement ahead of tomorrow’s F-Gas Review meeting.  

Tomorrow (July 19th) the environment attachés of the Member States will meet in Brussels to discuss the F-gas Regulation review.  The focus will be mostly on the ban of pre-charged equipment.  EHPA has provided the following input:

 “The EHPA, as the representative of the European heat pump industry, welcomes the efforts of the Council members to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. However, it still has some concerns on the current Council text.

The European Heat Pump Association

  1. Rejects the ban on pre-charged equipment (Art. 12) and suggests to include all F-gases (in bulk and pre-charged) in the phase down instead;
  2. Calls for an efficient tracking system of all F-gases (quotas) placed on the EU market;
  3. Encourages the distribution of placing-on-the-market quotas via a market-based system to ensure cost-efficient availability of F-gases within the phase down trajectory;
  4. Re-iterates that heat pumps are a contributor to more energy efficiency, more RES and less CO2 emissions and should be protected against any further burden in order to unleash their potential.”

Click here to download the EHPA position paper.

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On the 12th July Greg Barker, the Minister of State for Climate Change confirmed that the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme would commence next spring and published the tariff levels.  The tariff levels could mean a boost for solar thermal, biomass and heat pump technologies.

Download the domestic RHI Policy Statement

The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) confirmed that tariff levels for air source heat pumps have been set at 7.3p/kWh, biomass boilers at 12.2p/kWh, ground source heat pumps will be eligible for 18.8p/kWh, and solar thermal systems will receive 19.2p/kWh.

The government first announced RHI in 2009, however even though it has been available to the Non-domestic sector since Nov 2011, it has not been available in the Domestic sector. One off payments were available under the RHPP scheme which will end as  the Domestic RHI scheme takes over.

Greg Barker said:

“The Coalition is committed to helping hardworking families with the cost of living. Investing for the long-term in new renewable heat technologies will mean cleaner energy and cheaper bills. So this package of measures is a big step forward in our drive to get innovative renewable heating kit in our homes.  Householders can now invest in a range of exciting heating technologies knowing how much the tariff will be for different renewable heat technologies and benefit from the clean green heat produced. We are also sending a clear signal to industry that the Coalition is 110 percent committed to boosting and sustaining growth in this sector.”

DECC said the scheme was open to homes on and off the gas grid, but the tariffs have been set at a level designed to compensate for the difference between the cost of installing and running renewable heat systems against the cost of rival fossil fuel systems over a 20 year period.  The scheme is now expected to launch in Spring 2014 but, significantly, any eligible renewable heat technology installed since 15 July 2009, when the scheme was first announced, will be able to access the incentives.

It is hoped that the domestic RHI scheme can help renewable heat technologies be deployed at scale, making it easier for the industry to reduce costs and stimulate further demand for the technology.

The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) helps businesses, the public sector and non-profit organisations meet the cost of installing renewable heat technologies.  The RHI is the main scheme of the Government’s heat strategy.

The types of heating covered by the RHI scheme are:

  • biomass
  • heat pumps (ground source and water source)
  • geothermal
  • solar thermal collectors
  • biomethane and biogas

The non-domestic RHI scheme supports renewable heat installations in business, industry and the public sector, as well as heat networks.  In 2012 DECC consulted on proposals for introducing greater certainty to organisations who are either wanting to join the RHI or existing participants’, as well as improving the application process. The Government response was published outlining how DECC plans to implement these proposals by ensuring the scheme:

  • remains financially sustainable
  • offers good value for money for the tax payer
  • meets previous commitments to introduce biomass sustainability by setting out sustainability criteria for fuel source and greenhouse gas emissions and air quality emissions limits
  • reduces administrative burdens to Ofgem and applicants

DECC is currently finalising the details of the expansion of the non-domestic RHI scheme and will confirm the way forward in the autumn alongside the outcome of the tariff review

This article is brought to you by Fridgehub - a major new industry website for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

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The European Union has revealed that its total greenhouse gas emissions in 2011 were 18.4% lower than levels produced in 1990, according to the greenhouse gas inventory report.

The ‘Annual European Union greenhouse gas inventory 1990-2011 and inventory report’ is the submission of the greenhouse gas inventory of the EU to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The report has been produced by The European Commission's Directorate-General for Climate Action, the European Environment Agency‘s (EEA), the European Topic Centre for Air Pollution and Climate Change Mitigation (ETC/ACM), Eurostat, the EU's statistical office along with contributions from the Joint Research Centre.

The report demonstrates that the level of greenhouse gas emissions dropped by 3.3% in the European Union throughout 2011, reaching the lowest level of emissions since 1990.

The reduction in emissions for this period was attributable to a milder winter period in 2011 than 2010. The milder winter ultimately led to a decrease in demand for heating as well as a reduction in fossil fuel consumption.

 Jacqueline McGlade, executive director, European Environment Agency (EEA) said:

“The greenhouse gas emissions cut in 2011 is good news, however, it was largely due to a warmer winter”

She continued:

“Nonetheless, the EU is making clear progress towards its emission targets. There was an increase in consumption of more carbon-intensive fuels such as coal, while hydroelectricity production and gas consumption decreased. If Europe is to achieve the transition toward a low-carbon society, it will need sustained investment in technology and innovation.”

The report highlights that around two thirds of the reduction in emissions in 2011 came from France, Germany and the UK.

The EEA (European Environment Agency) Annual European Union greenhouse gas inventory 1990-2011 and inventory report is available to download here

In Autumn this year, the EEA will publish the Approximated EU Greenhouse Gas Inventory which will highlight the total EU emissions for 2012. The report will officially become available in late May and will be submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) by the EU.

Sources:

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Our latest blog post brings you a handy guide to the UK’s Trade Associations and professional bodies that serve the RACHP industry.  You will find helpful background information, web links and contact information to assist in making informed decisions on all aspects surrounding refrigeration, air conditioning, heat pump and mechanical ventilation equipment.

ACRIB
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Industry Board (ACRIB)-
http://www.acrib.org.uk/

The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Industry Board provides a central forum for all sectors and interests which fall within or are served by the air conditioning, heat pump and refrigeration industry.

Its member organisations represent manufacturers, distributors, contractors, consulting engineers, specifiers, end users, training providers, researchers and others with a direct interest in the environmentally friendly and cost effective provision and use of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment. Member organisations are: Association of Manufacturers of Domestic Equipment, Associated Refrigeration Contractors, Building & Engineering Services Association (RACHP Group), British Frozen Food Federation, Cambridge Refrigeration Technology, Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, Federation of Environmental Trade Associations, Food Storage and Distribution Federation, Institute of Refrigeration.

The aims and objectives of the organisation are pursued through committees and working groups, all of which report to the Board. The three main areas of activity are: environment and energy; education and training; and technical safety and standards.  Its activities include:

  • Operating ACRIB skillCard, a widely recognised individual card scheme which is part of the CSCS skillcard scheme. The ACRIB skillcard helps individual operatives to demonstrate qualifications and training including which refrigerants they are qualified to use
  • Advising UK Government on the implementation of regulations and legislation
  • Representing industry on education and training issues and liaising with organisations such as City & Guilds and SummitSkills on the development of national qualifications
  • Responding to issues such as system efficiency and safety, waste regulations, performance standards, food safety and safety at work
  • Maintaining active membership of EPEE, the European Partnership for Energy and the Environment.

ACRIB
Kelvin House,
76 Mill Lane
Carshalton
Surrey
SM5 2JR

Tel +44 (0) 208 254 7845
Email acrib@acrib.org.uk

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CIBSE

Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) - http://www.cibse.org/

The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers received its Royal Charter in 1976. It is the professional body that exists to:

‘support the Science, Art and Practice of building services engineering, by providing our members and the public with first class information and education services and promoting the spirit of fellowship which guides our work.'

CIBSE promotes the career of building services engineers by accrediting courses of study in further and higher education, by approving workbased training programmes and providing routes to full professional Registration and Membership, including Chartered Engineer, Incorporated Engineer and Engineering Technician. Once you are qualified, CIBSE offers you a range of services, all focussed on maintaining and enhancing professional excellence throughout your career.

CIBSE
222 Balham High Road
London
SW12 9BS

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IOR

Institution of Refrigeration (IOR)  - http://www.ior.org.uk/

The IOR is a central meeting point for people from all over the world to promote, improve and learn more about refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pumps.

RACHP technologies play a vital part in the lives of everyone in the modern world.  If you work in these fields you can demonstrate your professionalism by becoming a member of the IOR at a full Member, Associate, Affiliate, Technician or Student level.   It is an independent organisation, run for professionals by professionals.

Membership benefits

  • Free access to quality, practical information and updates through a over 200 Technical Guidance Notes, Service Engineer Good Practice Guides and website downloads.
  • Annual Data-CD full of technical information including Refrigerant Codes of Practice, Guidance notes, REAL Zero guidelines, and catalogue of 10 years of technical papers
  • Independent updates on legislation, standards and Government consultations
  • Certified Continuing Professional Development opportunities
  • A route to becoming a Chartered Engineer, Incorporated Engineer or Engineering Technician via the Engineering Council
  • Advance notice and reduced-rates for IOR seminars and events
  • Newsletters and technical papers in regular mailings
  • Networking meetings with others who have the same business and professional interests at local branch meetings, annual dinners, conferences and free evening seminars
  • The use of designatory letters after your name for those who meet the appropriate membership standard ie FInstR, MInstR, AMInstR, TMInstR

The IOR is registered with the Charity Commission as an educational and scientific body (reg no 250 081). It is governed by an elected Council of Members who act as Charity Trustees.

Institute of Refrigeration

Kelvin House
76 Mill Lane
Carshalton
Surrey SM5 2JR
England

Phone: +44 (0)20 8647 7033
e-mail: ior@ior.org.uk

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B&ES

B&ES (Building & Engineering Services Association) - http://www.b-es.org/

B&ES is the UK's leading trade association for building services engineering contractors. Founded in 1904, it adds value to members' businesses by providing quality services, promoting excellence and shaping the commercial environment through representation and leadership.

The B&ES represents the interests of firms active in the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration (hvacr) products and equipment. B&ES members are subject to regular, third-party inspection and assessment to ensure their technical and commercial competence.

B&ES member companies benefit from access to a wide range of services which are carefully tailored to their needs, and which help them to build better and more profitable businesses.

B&ES is a member of the TA Forum. Since its formation in 1997, the Trade Association Forum has been encouraging the development and sharing of best practice among UK trade associations and promoting the role of effective trade associations to government, industry and the wider public.

B&ES Head Office
Esca House,
34 Palace Court,
London W2 4JG.

Tel: 020 7313 4900.

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FETA

Federation of Environmental Trade Associations (FETA) - http://www.feta.co.uk

FETA is the recognised UK body representing the interests of over 400 manufacturers, suppliers, installers and contractors within the heating, ventilating, building controls, refrigeration & air conditioning industry to policy makers and the wider public.

FETA works closely with Government bodies, other associations and organisations nationally, in Europe and in the US. Access the full network here: click here.

Other relevant associations within the FETA network:

Other relevant associations within the FETA network:

BRA
The British Refrigeration Association
http://www.feta.co.uk/associations/bra

bcia
The Building Controls Industry Association
http://www.feta.co.uk/associations/bcia

HEVAC
HEVAC
http://www.feta.co.uk/associations/hevac

HPA
Heat Pump Association
http://www.feta.co.uk/associations/hpa

 

Federation of Environmental Trade Associations Ltd
2 Waltham Court,
Milley Lane,
Hare Hatch,
Reading,
Berkshire, RG10 9TH
United Kingdom

Tel: + 44 (0)118 940 3416
Fax: + 44 (0)118 940 6258

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This blog article is brought to you by fridgehub® - a major new industry website for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

Our vision is to become a leading outsourcing partner to industry, business and stakeholders through our technology, distribution and marketing services platforms, delivering defined benefits to our community.

At our heart is a social network community, which is set to become a knowledge-based centre of excellence, providing solutions and support to industry and advancing the development of skills within the field of refrigeration.

Through our website you will also be able to gain access to career, eLearning and business (B2B) opportunities.

www.fridgehub.com

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

The refrigeration industry has been working overtime by lobbying MEPs to relax the targets set by the European ENVI committee in June.

Refrigeration bodies throughout Europe such as ACRIB, BRA, EPEE and AREA have combined their strengths and say they are redoubling efforts to convince European policymakers that the proposals from the European Parliament ENVI Committee (Environment, Public Health and Food Safety) agreed last week are too stringent.  Here, we publish an article that RACPlus featured as the news hit:

Call for compromise on F-Gas Targets

Refrigeration bodies believe that compromise is needed to ensure that the refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump industry does not bear the brunt of costs for an accelerated phase-down of HFCs and early new equipment bans in key sectors, from large refrigeration systems to air conditioning.

As it stands, the following key bans to equipment ‘placed on the market’ in Europe have been proposed:

  • Ban on stationary refrigeration equipment containing F-gases with GWP of 2500 or more from 1 January 2016 (except equipment intended for use at operating temperatures of below -50 deg C)
  • Ban on stationary refrigeration equipment containing any F-gases from 1 January 2020  (except equipment intended for use at operating temperatures of below -50 deg C)
  • Ban on stationary air conditioning equipment containing F-gases from 1 January 2020
  • Ban on for commercial refrigerators and freezers, containing HFCs with GWP of 2150 (down from 2500 in original Commission proposal from 1 January 2015 (instead of 2017).
  • Ban on commercial refrigerators and freezers containing HFCs in general from 1 January 2018 (instead of 2020 and original threshold of GWP removed)
  • Ban on AC equipment in cargo ships containing F-gases as of 1 January 2020
  • Ban on mobile refrigeration equipment containing F-gases from 1 January 2025

The fridgehub®Guide to Common Refrigerants’ can be found here.

The ENVI committee has made amendments which appear to take energy efficiency into account when applying the ban but at the same time, it has tightened the criteria so it applies to total lifecycle emissions.

(Article content source reference: RACPlus.com )

Read the full report here.

 

This blog article is brought to you by fridgehub® - a major new industry website for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

Our vision is to become a leading outsourcing partner to industry, business and stakeholders through our technology, distribution and marketing services platforms, delivering defined benefits to our community.  At our heart is a social network community, which is set to become a knowledge-based centre of excellence, providing solutions and support to industry and advancing the development of skills within the field of refrigeration.

Through our website you will also be able to gain access to career, eLearning and business (B2B) opportunities.

 

www.fridgehub.com

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

 

 

A Guide to Common Refrigerants and Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) and Global Warming Potential (GWP) are indicated below.

  • Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) of a chemical compound is the relative amount of degradation it can cause to the ozone layer.
  • Global Warming Potential (GWP) is a measure of how much a given mass of a gas contributes to global warming. GWP is a relative scale which compares the amount of heat trapped by greenhouse gas to the amount of heat trapped in the same mass of Carbon Dioxide. The GWP of Carbon Dioxide is by definition 1.

 

closed refridgerant cycle

Guide to flammable refrigerants  Low GWP Refrigerants
 

Fridgehub is a major new industry resource, information and directory service for consumers of Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heat Pump equipment, products and services.

Stay in touch with the latest industry developments - Register here

To find out more visit – Fridgehub for Consumers or Fridgehub for Industry

A new research centre combining the HVAC expertise of four British Universities has been created to develop cost-effective and energy-efficient heating and cooling technologies.

The project, led by London South Bank University (LSBU), who successfully secured funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to investigate how to reduce UK energy consumption from cooling systems by 2050.

The £1.2 million funding is part of a £5.25 million project, led by the University of Warwick, to investigate heating, cooling and heat storage. The goal of the project is to minimize future greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption.

With more than 40 per cent of fossil fuels used for low temperature heating and 16 per cent of electricity used for cooling, these are key areas to address if the UK is to meet its targets of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent by 2050.

The Interdisciplinary centre for Storage, Transformation and Upgrading of Thermal Energy (i-STUTE), which will house the project, will also bring together technologists from the University of Ulster and Loughborough University.

The collaborating institutions working will work in the i-STUTE to develop technologies to reduce energy consumption and deliver cost-effective heating and cooling.

LSBU's team will consist of Lecturers and Researchers from the Faculty of Engineering, Science and the Built Environment, including Dr Deborah Andrews, Dr Issa Chaer, Dr Gareth Davies, Dr Alex Paurine, Professor Judith Evans, and Professor Graeme Maidment.

Professor Graeme Maidment said: "Cooling is an important technology for many things we take for granted, it is critical to food manufacture, development of pharmaceuticals and chemicals, as well as keeping datacentres and the internet servers cool.

As a large user or electricity and greenhouse gas producer, it is essential that we develop better cooling technologies for the low carbon economy. This project will provide new technologies and knowledge to enable industry to adapt and meet future challenges."

Further information about LSBU can be found here, and courses run by the Faculty of Engineering, Science and the Built Environment can be found here

This blog article is brought to you by fridgehub® - a major new industry website for manufacturers, distributers, service providers, operators and consumers of refrigeration, air conditioning and heat-pump (RACHP) products and services.

www.fridgehub.com

Follow @theFridgehub on Twitter

Minimising the heat gains on refrigerated cabinets and cold rooms cuts the cooling load on your refrigeration system and saves you energy and money.

Any energy efficiency initiative dealing with refrigeration should start by reviewing the heat gains on your system.  If you understand the nature of these gains, you’ll be able to manage the amount of cooling that needs to be done and make energy savings. Heat gains include warm air entering the cabinet or cold room and heat produced by electrical equipment within the cooled space.

This guide covers in detail two opportunities to reduce heat gains: reducing cold air changes using strip curtains, and using EC (electronically commutated) replacement motors for evaporator fans.

The business case - You will find opportunities for reducing heat gains on refrigerated cabinets and cold rooms in most applications.  Improving door management in cold rooms results in substantial energy savings. For example, installing plastic strip curtains to a cold room can give savings of up to 30%, and have a payback period of around a year.

Replacing conventional shaded-pole fan motors with equivalent EC motors can cut their energy use by 65%, as well as generating less heat and reducing your maintenance replacements.  You can maximise the saving achieved by fitting a whole new fan assembly instead of just replacing the motor. In most applications the payback period for fitting EC motor fans is one to two years, but it can be much shorter.

How to reduce heat gain in refrigeration (CTL137)- Click to view

Further information on the Carbon Trust guidance documents can be found by clicking here.

Reducing the heat load on your existing large refrigeration systems can save energy and cut your running costs. It can also reduce the capital cost of a new plant and even eliminate the need to invest in a new plant altogether.

This guide is aimed at users of existing large refrigeration systems such as those in supermarkets, central air conditioning systems, large cold stores and large industrial processes. It will help you to minimise your cooling needs and to meet them as efficiently as possible using the most suitable refrigeration system.  Both of these will result in energy savings.

Before you start any refrigeration energy efficiency initiative it is vital to review the heat loads on your cooling plant. If you understand the nature of your loads you can make sure they are met while at the same time minimising the energy cost of your refrigeration systems.

The business case - There are opportunities to reduce the heat load on refrigeration systems at almost all sites.  Savings and costs will vary depending on the type of opportunity.  Often payback periods are less than one year, and sometimes even no-cost heat load reductions are possible.

If you are planning to install a new plant, reducing its heat load could reduce the capital cost. If your existing refrigeration system currently struggles to supply enough cooling, reducing the heat load on your system could avoid the need for an expensive new plant altogether.

How to reduce heat load in refrigeration (CTL138) – Click to view

Further information on the Carbon Trust guidance documents click here.